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The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) opposes it, as does the Free Software Foundation. Most Americans are aware of the protections afforded by the U. Constitution's fourth amendment against unreasonable searches and seizures.In general, this means that the government cannot search your person, home, vehicle, or computer without to believe that you've engaged in some criminal act.In other words, simply disabling the copy protection is a federal crime. federal law that was passed during the Clinton administration.There are some exemptions, such as circumventing copy protection of programs that are in an obsolete format for the purpose of archiving or preservation. Prior to this act, copyright violations were generally treated as civil matters and could not be prosecuted criminally unless it was done for commercial purposes.

But if you decide to hop onto the nearest unencrypted Wi-Fi network to surf the Internet, knowing full well that it doesn't belong to you and no one has given you permission, you could be prosecuted under these laws.

Some states have laws that make it a crime to possess a "criminal instrument" or the "tool of a crime." Depending on the wording of the law, this can be construed to mean any device that is designed or adapted for use in the commission of an offense.

This means you could be arrested and prosecuted, for example, for constructing a high gain wireless antenna for the purpose of tapping into someone else's Wi-Fi network, even if you never did in fact access a network.

In this article, we'll take a look at some of the existing laws and some of the pending legislation that can influence how we use our computers and the Internet.

Nothing in this article should be construed as legal advice; this is merely an overview of some of the legislation that's out there, how it has been interpreted by the courts (if applicable), and possible implications for computer users.

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